Filming Cliff-Jumping Geese: On Location | Hostile Planet

Published by Darron Toy on



The animals who are
filmed for "Hostile Planet" have to survive in
incredibly tough conditions. But they're adapted to it. The crew, on the
other hand, that's a whole different ball game. RENEE GODFREY: Making a
series like "Hostile Planet" wasn't simple. We filmed on every continent
on Earth with over 270 people on our cruise. And it took us over
three years to make. OK, might be worth turning
your cameras on, gentlemen. [animals screech] TOM HUGH-JONES:
Inevitably, if you're going to follow the animals
that are having to survive in the most extreme
corners of the planet, you have to go there too. And you get a slight taste
of what their lives are like, and it's brutal. MATEO WILLIS: Mountains
are a unique environment. There are other places which
are hotter, like deserts. And there are places which
are colder, like the Arctic. Surprisingly, the greatest
challenge in mountains is gravity. Because everything is an
effort against gravity. Everything is trying
to push you down. All right, let's do this
before any rocks fall. Probably the thing that
shocked and surprised me most were these little barnacle
geese chicks in Greenland. They would walk to
the edge of a cliff, and then they would
throw themselves off, plummeting to the bottom. And then they would
hit the bottom and stand up and walk away. And you just think,
how does life survive something so extreme
as falling hundreds of feet? I would be just
shattered into pieces. And yet this tiny
little gosling, you know, no bigger than a
couple of inches, doesn't. [birds chirping] Another day in the office. MATEO WILLIS: Filming the
barnacle geese on those cliffs was probably the single
trickiest thing to accomplish. We needed to get a shot
where I wanted the camera over the top of that nest. We needed to see what
those chicks were seeing. We needed to know what
it felt to look over that edge for the first time. And the only way to
do that was to get an 8 meter crane with
a camera on the end swung out over that nest. But of course, there was
no area to put the crane. You were on this tiny ledge
that was, say, no bigger than a couple of doormats. And so you had to balance
the entire crane and all the weights on top of
it, so you probably had 250 pounds of weights
and an $80,000 camera on the other end of the crane. And then you had to somehow
swing it over and get it out there without
everything giving way and collapsing around you. More speed and pan to the left. And that was probably
the only time I've ever stopped and
thought, is this really worth it for the shot? if
it all goes wrong, is it worth it for one shot? And it was. [birds whooping] [music playing]


33 Comments

National Geographic · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Filming a series such as Hostile Planet takes a lot of time and patience. What are your thoughts on the filmmaking process for wildlife documentaries?

Chenalin De Los Santos · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Woooooooow this is incredible! Oh wait i dont know if that word is exact!

Azizul Haque · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

‘That shot’ was worth much more!!!

It is I · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

I have to command Nat Geo for these series.

Maximus Augustus · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

National Geographic is our national treasure.

Maximus Augustus · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

I want that camera

Koma- san · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

born to be wild has left the group.

Christopher Dobey · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Nat Geo May we please have more attention to detail when uploading to YouTube? These 1080p uploads are not doing the RED & Zeiss camera rig any justice

chlem arcelo · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Has Bear Grylls switched networks?

Daniel Dwiky · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Thanks for your hardwork dude

XilenT Mode · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

I see him on discovery and animal planet.

ridwan kamazarove · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Crane at mountain..

Nešňup Tolko · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

The barnacle geese chicks video was the most gut wrenching thing I have ever saw on film. Ever.

Shahzad Khan · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

You guys are amazing and really inspiring. Salute and respect to you

Praveen S · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

I was always wondering, how do they film these shots. It's not a easy job but passion and patience is rewarded in the end.

Chow Yew Wah · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

😮😮😮😥😥😥

greenpegasus88sz · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Why does this have dislikes!!?? 🤣😂🤣

Aj Rana · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

A big thank you for the efforts of these people.

Wijione · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Taking all that gear up the mountain, thanks for the effort and keep making these great films

El mundo oculto · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

National Geographic are the best filmakers of wildlife.

Gohar Hassan Dar · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

More insights like these!

뭘 하면 좋으려나? what should i do?何をすればいいかな?. · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

They do live in a hostile environment.

Anton En · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Wow

Jerrylyn Young · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Woww…That's great!! I cannot wait to watch all the pictures and the films you have done. I love it. I will be waiyng for yours from Thailand.

Arka Navarro · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

😮😮😮

Teri Scallon · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

wow…I couldn't watch that whole video. I will try again now knowing the effort that went into it.

Joseph Yosef Roach · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Absolutely amazing… I salute you guys!

deb patterson · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

I did record a hostile planet, deleted it after the babies died. Please put warning on your videos for us overly sensitive individuals, yes I know it's animal nature but some give me a panic attack alot of NG stuff I watch I think you had one strange rock awesome!

dinicti · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Thank you for bringing this peek into nature for general viewing; it makes a difference

សុខភា លីលី Health · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Good love

Pakistani Queen · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Thank u National Geographic for this. You guys are amazing❤

Matiss Stein · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Where can we see this masterpiece?

David Mashil · May 15, 2019 at 3:34 pm

Respect.

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